The Best Places for Sledding in Pittsburgh

Winter may bring high heating bills and icy roads, but the season isn’t all bad. Sledding is a favorite winter pastime the whole family can enjoy. So pack a sled or two into your Ford SUV or truck and head out to one of these best places for sledding in Pittsburgh.

Blueberry Hill Park and Knob Hill Park

Let’s start in our own suburb of Wexford, Pennsylvania. Two great spots include Blueberry Hill Park, which is off of I-79 and I-279 North, and Knob Hill Park. Blueberry Hill Park has its own designated sledding area—that’s how great it is.

South Park

Sunny Slopes in Pittsburgh is a perfect spot for sledding, whether cloudy or sunny. The area includes three hills, one of which boasts a 1,000-foot-long slope for optimal sledding speed. Of course, all that fun on the way down means a long trek back up for the next go.

Chapel Hill

Head to Chatham University for a sledding legend: Chapel Hill. The slope starts at the Chatham Memorial Chapel and is not too often frequented, making it a great spot for family fun.

Flagstaff Hill

Flagstaff Hill is among the most popular sledding hills in Pittsburgh. In fact, it’s a great spot for tobogganing, mild snowboarding, and a good old-fashioned snowball fight. The spot is near Phipps Conservatory.

We here at Shults Ford Wexford encourage you and your family to enjoy the winter season and all the snow-based fun it delivers.

best places for sledding in Pittsburgh

Techniques For Driving In The Snow

Doesn’t it seem like every time it turns cold and the snow starts to fall, everyone else on the road is just learning how drive in it? Avoid looking like a rookie out there by checking out these strategies that will help you manage when you are driving in the snow.

Just like bicyclists with helmets get in more accidents than those without helmets, using 4WD can create an excessive sense of confidence. The important part to remember is that while 4WD can help your vehicle handle better, preventing you from spinning out, it does not help you brake any better. Leave yourself plenty of stopping distance.

Don’t tail other drivers. Of course, this is good advice even under perfect conditions. But when there is snow and ice on the ground, you should allow an almost excessive amount of distance between yourself and the driver ahead of you. Double or triple your normal distance.

Probably the most nuanced strategy has to do with how you brake in the snow. When you feel your car begin to slide or lose traction, slamming on the brakes to the point that your wheels lock-up is very counter-productive. At that point, steering is irrelevant. Try letting off the accelerator. That way you can still steer.

Put these skills to the test the next time it snows with a new car from Shults Ford Lincoln of Wexford.

driving in the snow